Tag Archives: yarn

hanging yarn banner

I have historically categorized any type of wall art into categories like: “later,” “unnecessary,” and “not now.” When it comes to budgeting my time, money, and decision-making capacity, I can never commit. Even if it’s something cheap and small.

My homes throughout the years have suffered from a sad lack of art and decor. It stems from my minimalist and frugal tendencies,  but another part comes from the side of me that is loathe to pull any type of trigger.

In my mind, it goes something like this, “If I buy this piece unframed, I can save money by getting it framed locally. But where would I do that? I’d have to research this. How much money would I really save? God, this is turning into a lot  of work…” And the dialogue goes on until I decide I have other things I need to focus on. So I table this discussion another few months only to start it over.

I’m working on it. I really want art in my house. Until that happens,  I’ll continue to supplement my bare walls with interesting shelves, statement walls, and the few plants that manage to stay alive.

Wall-Art-3

I’ve seen a few of these yarn wall pieces floating around pinterest, and I thought, “why not?” I needed a reason to visit the Lion Brand Yarn Studio by Union Square. I was pleased to find the quality of yarn was much higher than I expected and the prices were on the low side, which is a relief if you know what it’s like to try to find reasonably priced yarn in NYC.

I settled on these three colors.

Yarn-Art-2

The gem of this batch was the light yarn with the gold leaf, which stays attached to the yarn quite well.

Yarn-Art-1

I was so thrilled when I found it, when I took it home to Ryan, I showed him with pride, exclaiming how it matches our gold and white theme in the house.

To which he replied, “I didn’t know we had a gold and white theme.”

Doing a face-palm never felt  more appropriate.

Wall-Art-4

Hanging Wall Art Supplies

-3 different types of yarn. You won’t use a whole skein, so this is a good project for leftover yarn.
-2 two-feet wooden dowels
-Copper wire or twine for hanging

This project is pretty simple and fast. You’ll want to prep the yarn by cutting it into a lot of equal-length strings.

Grab the bottom dowel, and  taking the cut yarn, loop some knots working left to right. Continue making knots to the width that you prefer. I stopped in the middle to change colors, making sure the outer colors had the same amount of knots to keep the symmetry.

Yarn-Art-3

Once you’ve completed the bottom row, do the same with the top row. I wanted my top row of yarn to have a smaller width, so I did fewer knots. Then I secured the two dowels together by tying them together with copper wire. You can also use string or twine for this step.

Wall-Art-1

Once they were attached, I took the scissors to it to try to even out the shape. It turned out nicely.Wall-Art-2

One of these days, I’ll get around to creating my own weaving to display on the wall. I’ve even taken a loom weaving class! But in the meantime, this piece adds a bit of texture and color to the room.

how to make a pom pom using a fork

I’ve been creating pom poms for the past two weeks to use on various Christmas themed projects. I make them using a really simple technique with yarn and a fork. The tutorial below shows you how it’s done. Also, I created an instructable on this and it made it on the instructable homepage, which was quite the moment of d.i.y. glory.

Supplies:
– fork
–  yarn
– scissors


The pom poms in this tutorial are 1 inch in diamater. I created them using a regular dinner fork. If you want to make larger pom poms, you’ll need a bigger fork, like a salad fork. The image below shows the difference in pom pom size.

 Step 1: Wrap your fork

Keeping the yarn attached to the ball, begin wrapping the yarn around your fork. It’s just like wrapping spaghetti. Keep your wraps tight.

For small pom poms, wrap the yarn around the dinner fork about twenty times. For larger pom poms, wrap the yarn around a larger fork around fifty times. You can play around with the size and shape of the pom pom by varying the number of wraps. The more you wrap it, the fuller it will be.

If you want all of your pom poms to come out the same size, be sure to wrap them all around the same number of times.

Step 2: Tying Off

When you’ve finished wrapping, cut the yarn on the fork and hold it in place. Cut another piece of yarn a few inches long. String this piece through the bottom of the fork, under the wrap, from front to back. Keep the yarn behind the wrap.

Once you’ve threaded it through, bring the yarn back around so the two ends meet. Then tie them together.

Step 3: Pulling it off the fork

Once you’ve tied it, push the wrap off of the fork, keeping the tie in place.

When the wrap is off the fork, pull the bow tight, so that the yarn begins to curl. Tie it one more time just to secure everything.

Step 4: Cutting the wrap

Now, take your scissors and put them under the little loops created in the rounded ball of yarn. As you cut the loops, you’ll see the pom pom begin to form.

Once you’ve cut all of the loops, go around the pom pom and cut any pieces of yarn that may be sticking out too far. Make sure the pom pom symmetrical.

 

Finished!

Yay! You’ve done it. These things take just a few seconds to make and create excellent cat toys.

This week I’ll be posting a few tutorials showing how I’m using these in my holiday decorations. Stay tuned.