All posts by heidi

NYC Meow Parlour Cat Cafe

Warning there will be lots of photos of cats and cat-shaped things.

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NYC Meow Parlour is part cafe and part cat heaven.  The idea came from crowded Asian cities with small apartments that wouldn’t allow pets. These cafes let you interact with cats in a homey environment, without having the responsibility of being a full-time cat mom (or dad).

It’s kind of perfect. If I didn’t have two cats of my own, I’d probably live at a cat cafe.

The best part, they’re adoptable! But I can’t imagine the cats wanting to leave. The cat cafe was  glorious – so many places for them to climb, sleep, and play!

We went in the middle of the day, so the cats were doing what they do best.

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Sleeping.

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This is an ottoman with a cat bed inside. Brilliant.

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Our trip wouldn’t be complete without some excitement.

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There was lots of drama over the toys.

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Sleeping in the toy box because #yolo.

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My friend Sara and I booked our visit to the cafe months in advance! That’s how busy it is! So as not to exhaust the poor kitties, they limit the amount of people who can visit the cafe in a day.

You can also purchase coffee and treats at the cafe across the street and bring them into the cat area. Are you ready for this?

So many cat shaped sweets!

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It was all very cute. And tasty!

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The whole cafe was super cute and calming. It had everything you’d find in your favorite coffee shops, plus cats!

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hanging yarn banner

I have historically categorized any type of wall art into categories like: “later,” “unnecessary,” and “not now.” When it comes to budgeting my time, money, and decision-making capacity, I can never commit. Even if it’s something cheap and small.

My homes throughout the years have suffered from a sad lack of art and decor. It stems from my minimalist and frugal tendencies,  but another part comes from the side of me that is loathe to pull any type of trigger.

In my mind, it goes something like this, “If I buy this piece unframed, I can save money by getting it framed locally. But where would I do that? I’d have to research this. How much money would I really save? God, this is turning into a lot  of work…” And the dialogue goes on until I decide I have other things I need to focus on. So I table this discussion another few months only to start it over.

I’m working on it. I really want art in my house. Until that happens,  I’ll continue to supplement my bare walls with interesting shelves, statement walls, and the few plants that manage to stay alive.

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I’ve seen a few of these yarn wall pieces floating around pinterest, and I thought, “why not?” I needed a reason to visit the Lion Brand Yarn Studio by Union Square. I was pleased to find the quality of yarn was much higher than I expected and the prices were on the low side, which is a relief if you know what it’s like to try to find reasonably priced yarn in NYC.

I settled on these three colors.

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The gem of this batch was the light yarn with the gold leaf, which stays attached to the yarn quite well.

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I was so thrilled when I found it, when I took it home to Ryan, I showed him with pride, exclaiming how it matches our gold and white theme in the house.

To which he replied, “I didn’t know we had a gold and white theme.”

Doing a face-palm never felt  more appropriate.

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Hanging Wall Art Supplies

-3 different types of yarn. You won’t use a whole skein, so this is a good project for leftover yarn.
-2 two-feet wooden dowels
-Copper wire or twine for hanging

This project is pretty simple and fast. You’ll want to prep the yarn by cutting it into a lot of equal-length strings.

Grab the bottom dowel, and  taking the cut yarn, loop some knots working left to right. Continue making knots to the width that you prefer. I stopped in the middle to change colors, making sure the outer colors had the same amount of knots to keep the symmetry.

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Once you’ve completed the bottom row, do the same with the top row. I wanted my top row of yarn to have a smaller width, so I did fewer knots. Then I secured the two dowels together by tying them together with copper wire. You can also use string or twine for this step.

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Once they were attached, I took the scissors to it to try to even out the shape. It turned out nicely.Wall-Art-2

One of these days, I’ll get around to creating my own weaving to display on the wall. I’ve even taken a loom weaving class! But in the meantime, this piece adds a bit of texture and color to the room.

NYC Weekend: Bike Date on the West Side Highway

Yesterday, the weather was perfect and Ryan and I decided to tackle the West Side Highway. We’ve been saying we would bike it since we moved here. Two years later, I’m wondering what took us so long, because it was a blast.

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The West Side highway is part of Manhattan’s Waterfront Greenway. I was a little skeptical about the waterfront aspect, because the waterfront route I take in Brooklyn isn’t on the water, not really. But this route followed the Hudson River and we were on the water the entire time.

I’m always invigorated when I get near water. I was surrounded by it growing up and absolutely love it.

So our bike date started in Brooklyn. We biked over the Manhattan Bridge, through SoHo, and eventually met up with the West Side Highway. It was crowded, of course, but especially so because of Fleet Week. The bike path touches all of the piers and ports. There were a few times when we had to dismount because of the crowd.

Once we got past 55th street, everything cleared up. We made our first stop at a little park (or possibly part of Riverside Park?). I was excited to see some wildlife (always). Baby geese!

I know these babies are going to grow up to be monsters, but they were so cute! And the mama was surprisingly nice and let me get pretty close.  Also, we ran into a mallard and his lady. He was looking very handsome.

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My grandma instilled a love of mallards in me.

We ended up biking up to 125th street and cut across to eat at Seasoned Vegan in Harlem. After some fried “chicken” and pancakes, we felt fueled enough to head back.

We didn’t have a clear path back to the West Side Bike Path so ended up biking around Morningside Park and then through Riverside Park. After a few miles of biking, we stopped at a helipad to watch a huge helicopter take off. That was a first. Then we continued biking in silence until we stopped at a park south of Chelsea to take pictures of the flowers.

The park had a nice view of the water and downtown. Can you spot Ryan and our bikes?

I love my bike. It’s kind of crappy (it’s a Wal-Mart bike from the 90’s), but it’s been wonderful to me. It’s not fantastic for every-day commuting. It’s slow and weights almost twice as much as Ryan’s bike, even though his bike is much bigger than mine. But I think it’s super cute and fits my personality. I mean, I’m slow, and heavy for my size, and super cute. Right?

We then headed down to South Manhattan to finish our ride biking the southern tip of the peninsula.  We were pushed off the trail because of some construction and found this weird stone and plant structure by the water in the Battery.

It turns out it was the Irish Hunger Memorial. I thought it looked really out of place surrounded by hotels and concrete and that’s because it’s designed to reflect the scenery of rural Ireland.

We finished up our trip in Manhattan by going down to Battery City Park. I will not do this again. Sure you can see the Statue of Liberty and all of the ferries, but it’s a nightmare. There are people everywhere and the bike lanes are merged with the pedestrian lanes causing frustration for all. There’s also a lot of construction and confusion as to where the bike lanes are.

The whole trip was almost 29 miles and we were out for about five hours, so we were pretty exhausted by the end. The distance wasn’t as long as our trip on the St. Mark’s trail, but it definitely took a lot longer due to congestion.

During the past couple of days, Ryan and I have really picked up our biking. This ride put us in at around 70 miles this week, which is the most I’ve ever done!

 

 

blogger thoughts: perfectionism, pinterest, and self-promotion

As my last post mentioned, I started a new job and am happily assimilating to a career working and commuting into midtown Manhattan. So what does that mean for me? Well, a lot less free time. Mostly in terms of the long commute, which I try to make the best of, but it still takes almost two hours out of my day.

I’ve been biking to work pretty regularly to stay active. My legs are feeling stronger, but I miss running a lot and am hoping to incorporate a run or two on top of 80 minutes of biking every day.

I’m also struggling to get creative with meals at home. Lately, dinner consists of salads and sandwiches. By the time I get home, I’m exhausted and am not in the mood to cook something elaborate and even less in the mood to set up my mini-photo studio and take pictures of it for the blog.

Heidi Glasses

(new glasses from warby parker)

Which kind of has me thinking about the direction and future of my blog. I’ve thought a lot about incorporating more personal content – something I’ve always been too timid to do. In so many ways, I’m exhausted of the rat race that so often accompanies blogging. I love blogs, and in particular, I love feeling inspired to create new things. But if I create something that isn’t exactly photo worthy, or “pinnable,” I can’t stop questioning “what’s the point?” Even worse, I hate the feeling of failure that I happens when I’ve created something amazing (in my opinion) and it doesn’t get pinned a lot or I don’t get a lot of social hits. This is the dark side of blogging. Your blog’s value sometimes only feels like a metric.

I can’t stop thinking of how I felt when I first started blogging. I miss a lot about who I was and how I blogged at the beginning, back when I used a point-and-shoot with flash all the time and all of my images were blurry (so blurry…sigh…).  I didn’t spend nearly as much time on posts. I did what I could with what was available to me – a cheap camera with a built in flash and some dim lighting. Although I wanted to improve (and did, thank god), I didn’t let my perfectionism get in the way. I boldly posted those blurry photos or that terrible photoshopped image and didn’t think twice about who would pin it. Now, on more than one occasion, I’ve done an entire photo shoot and spent hours arduously editing photos before my perfectionism gets the best of me and I end up trashing the entire project. Since I don’t have a strong enough following to promote my content for me, I spend just as much time promoting a post as I do creating its content. Post frequency is down drastically, but quality and engagement has increased tremendously.

But in the beginning, I always felt like I was blogging for me. Or, at the very least, my audience agreed with my notions of “Well, no one has time to spend six hours a day blogging while working a full-time job and juggling fitness, relationships, and mental health.” But now, some of my favorite blogs are the ones with entire teams and studios, and I feel like I’ll never be able to attract people with my puny blog. Does anyone else feel this way?

Even now, I think to myself, what type of image should accompany this post? And the thought crossed my mind (I’m sure you’ve seen this on Pinterest) of some moody background image with the words “The Dark Side of Blogging.” That’s just not me or my brand.

Lately, maybe because I’ve been spending so much time writing at a computer, I’ve been journaling voraciously with a pen and paper. In general, I’m finding I need to spend more time away from computer and phone screens. This includes spending much less time on social media. Self-promotion has always been hard for me. And since the thought of visiting Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest is something I am absolutely uninterested in, you might see fewer interactions on the social front. It upsets me that this feels so much like blog suicide, or worse, giving up. It shouldn’t be that way.

Do you know any bloggers who have great blogs and a successful following, but don’t have a social media presence? Please share them with me.

As far as the state of the blog goes, Ryan worked to make the DIY and recipe pages easier to navigate. Now, you can see everything in that category all on a single page accompanied by an icon. I’ve also added a “travel and adventures” category to my menu. Without visiting new places and seeing new things, my life would be incomplete.

A Quick Trip to Finback Brewery

I wanted to share a few photos of our Saturday Trip to Finback Brewery in Queens.

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The weather was nice, the beer was solid, and the light was gorgeous. I had to take out my camera.

One of the worst things about winter is the light. It’s partially why a lot of my blogging slows down in the winter. I hate struggling to find good shots when everything seems dark and grey. It takes a lot longer to shoot and even longer to edit, since I’m such a perfectionist. One of my major criticisms about my blog photos is they’re all pretty dark. I’m building a lightbox/lightroom setup to combat that, but since I’m DIYing it (naturally) it’s taking some time.

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But back to the beer. I was obsessed with the brewery’s logo. When my friends suggested we go to the brewery, I went to the website and saw their logo and immediately was in. What can I say? I wish all sea animals could be my friend. Plus, of course, I just liked the design.

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Finback self-distributes in NYC only. We sampled all of their beers and they were all very good. Their wit beer was one of the best I’ve ever had. Most of the group agreed that “comforting” was the best way to describe their beers. I could sip them all day.

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My favorites were the Double Sess(ion) wit beer and the Starchild sour (photographed below). They had a huge selection of IPAs, black and reds, but sadly, I’m not an IPA fan.

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If you’re in New York or Queens, it’s a little off the beaten path, but definitely worth a visit.

March Recap: Philadelphia, Wolves, and Good News!

I’ve taken quite a long break from blogging as I embarked on a few changes this past month.

Heidi-and-Ryan-Feb-2015(Photo of Ryan and me on our six-year anniversary)

I’m excited to announce that I’ve been offered a communications position at an incredible company. I left my old job a few weeks ago and have taken some time off. I didn’t talk a lot about my old job on the blog, but it was incredibly draining and wearing me down. I knew for a while it wasn’t a good fit. I felt like I couldn’t make things happen, which is really important to me, and eventually started losing confidence in my abilities, especially as I interviewed and applied for other positions. I’ve always considered myself very employable, but New York’s scene is highly competitive. I promised myself I wouldn’t compromise on my salary and my criteria for my next job, so it ended up taking months to find something.

Eventually it all paid off! I was offered a manager’s position (a promotion!) at one of the best companies to work for in NYC. I can tell immediately that this is a much better fit. The interview process itself was refreshing. I was challenged and critiqued in ways that I never was at my old position. I’m excited to learn, grow, and thrive and hopefully it will carry over in other aspects of my life. Career success has always been very important to me. Knowing that I wasn’t thriving in my old position really affected other aspects of my life and left me depressed and unmotivated.

Anyway, I start Wednesday.

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This past month, I haven’t been motivated to take any photos. I fell into a creative rut with any and all photography. Everytime I look at my iphone photos and instagram, I am disappointed. I’m sure the cold, snowy days had something to do with it. Taking photos of white and grey things grew tiring and with the short days, it’s hard to get any natural light.

Small Adventures

In early March, Ryan and I took a trip down to Philadelphia to see a Punch Brothers concert. The concert was a lot of fun, but unfortunately, as we left the venue, it was starting to snow. Philly was hit by a terrible snowstorm that shut the city down. Our bus back was cancelled and we ended up staying another night in our AirBnB. Not a lot was open, except a bar or two, so Ryan and I walked through a few feet of falling snow to grab a some drinks. Then we walked back to our rental and snuggled up for the night. It wasn’t all that bad. It was good to get away, to be snowed in, and really only have each other to focus on. The only photo I took in Philly was of this very snowy historic graveyard.

Philadelphia

We also took a trip with a Meetup group to visit the Lakota Wolf Preservation in New Jersey. They had the usual cast of wolf packs: arctic, timber, and British Columbia wolves; along with red foxes and bobcats! Of course, I forgot my DSLR, so I am stuck with iPhone photos.

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Wolf2(just taking a nap)

All animals were healthy and happy with a good amount of space to roam, which is always great to see. I love most wildlife, but wolves usually make the top of the list. This isn’t the first wolf preservation I’ve visited. When I lived in Florida, we had an incredible time at the Seacrest Wolf Preserve, where I got to play with wolf puppies!

We followed the Wolf Preserve with a visit to a local winery for a very cheap and delicious wine tasting. They have two wines dedicated to the wolf preservation and all profits from those two wines are donated to the wolves.

Winery

Since I’ve had some time off in between jobs, I’ve spent the sunnier days visiting parks and the colder days at museums. I took a trip to the Museum of Arts and Design to see the Ralph Pucci: The Art of the Mannequin exhibit. We see mannequins every day, and it’s interesting to remind ourselves that someone designed these. These mannequins serve a purpose beyond holding clothes. They are meant to evoke emotions and convince shoppers that their face and body belong with that dress or shirt. Ralph Pucci did some great work and really broke away from the standard faceless mannequin stereotype.

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(Image via The Museum of Arts and Design)

During these few weeks off, I’ve been reading nonstop. It’s amazing I’m even leaving the house. I’ve already finished three books this month, and it’s not even half over. I expect this pace to slow down, but I hope it doesn’t.

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I’m spending the last of my unemployed days in Florida visiting my family. It’s nice to see them, but of course I miss Ryan and the kitties like mad. I’ll be back in a few days to give them all plenty of kisses.

Basic Tofu Scramble

I spent many, many years as a vegetarian before ever trying tofu scramble. I don’t know what I was thinking, because it’s so good. Even if you’re not a vegetarian, you should definitely give it a try because YOLO, right?

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I’m sure when that acronym was coined, they didn’t have eating tofu in mind.

I was so tempted to write that making tofu scramble is quick and fun, but thought that it sounded gimicky and generic. The truth is, while it doesn’t take long to cook (think scrambled eggs), it is fun. Well, if you think smashing tofu with a fork is fun, which I do.

And here’s where you all tell me to get out more…

I thought I’d hare a really basic tofu scramble, because the beauty of a tofu scram is you can add all sorts of vegetables in it to create something totally unique each time.

I recommend these combinations:

  • Southwest style with black beans, avocado, and seitan
  • Zucchini, yellow squash, or mushrooms
  • Spinach, pesto, feta
  • Top with tomato

I’m not of those people who think tofu is bland, I really enjoy the taste and am absolutely fine with eating it unseasoned. But if you’re feeling apprehensive about it, adding spices and mix-ins are key to getting a good flavor.

Basic Tofu Scramble
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Cuisine: Breakfast
Yields: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • ½ small yellow onion, chopped
  • ¼ red pepper, chopped
  • 1 16 oz container of extra-firm tofu, pressed
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • ¼ tsp tumeric
  • ¼ tsp paprika
  • salt & pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Drain the tofu of excess water by pressing for 30 minutes.
  2. Using a fork, smash the tofu until it reaches a scrambled texture.
  3. Heat your olive oil in a In a skillet over medium-low heat.
  4. Once it’s warm, toss in your onions, red peppers, tomato paste, and spices, mixing them together. Saute for about 5 minutes until they start to soften and the onions turn clear.
  5. Add the tofu and gently saute it for five minutes, making sure to cover it in the olive oil and spices.

 

You have to press the tofu before you cook it to get a really solid tofu scramble. I place the tofu between two plates, and put a heavy book on top of it. Then press it for about 30 min.

I’ve also noticed if you slice the tofu lengthwise into thinner pieces, you can drain more water from them.

Then comes the fun part of smashing the tofu with a fork until it’s reached a “scrambled” texture.

Chop the onions and red pepper.

Heat your olive oil in a In a skillet over medium-low heat. Once it’s warm, toss in your onions, red peppers, and spices, mixing them together. Sautee for about 5 minutes until they start to soften and the onions turn clear.

Then add the tofu and gently saute it for five minutes, making sure to cover it in the olive oil and spices. Eat warm and serve with cheese or your favorite hot sauce. This dish can last up to three days refrigerated. Let me know what you think! What are your favorite additions to tofu scramble?

homemade red velvet poptarts with cream cheese filling

The inspiration for these red velvet poptarts came from this thing I call my life notebook. You know, it’s a notebook stuffed full of life goals, to-do lists, blog posts, places to visit, books I’ve read, and grocery lists from months ago. And sometimes I leave myself little hints in the margins, like “move this to a google doc” (but it feels so much better to see my own handwriting!) and other suggestions, like “make something with clay.”

Well, the idea for these poptarts came from those margins. I don’t remember even writing this note to myself, but as I scanned the past pages of my notebook, I saw it in the interior-left top corner, a message from a brilliant, or maybe just hungry, lady:

“Make: Red Velvet Poptarts.”

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What a great Valentine’s day post! As I decided to commit to this endeavor and scanned the internet for a decent red velvet poptarts recipe, I became increasingly nervous. I couldn’t find one. Are they impossible to make? Kellog did it (gross). Eventually, I came to the decision that I’d have to wing it.

Homemade Red Velvet Poptarts

So here it is, a recipe that I developed, almost entirely from scratch.

If you’re going to make these red velvet poptarts for a Valentine’s Day surprise, give yourself some time. There’s a lot  involved. You can make these a day ahead of time and simply re-heat them in the oven at 300 degrees for a few minutes.

Homemade Red Velvet Poptarts

homemade red velvet poptarts
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Red Velvet poptarts with cream cheese filling from scratch!
Author:
Recipe type: breakfast
Yields: 12 pastries
Ingredients
For the pastry
  • 2 cups flour
  • 3 tbsp cocoa powder
  • ¼ c sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 sticks of cold butter, cubed and cold
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • ¼ cup buttermilk
  • ½ tsp red food dye (note: I used icing gels, you may need to use more food dye if you're using regular dye)
For the filling
  • 8 oz cream cheese, softened
  • ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 2 tbsp milk
Egg Wash
  • 1 egg
  • 2 Tbsp water
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs, buttermilk, and red food coloring, until blended.
  2. In a large bowl, sift together the cocoa powder, flour, sugar, and salt until well combined.
  3. Using a pastry blender push in the chunks of cold butter. If you don’t have a pastry blender, you can use your hands and a fork. Cut in the butter until there are no large pieces and your flour mixture resembles coarse, damp sand.
  4. Fold in the wet ingredients until everything is well combined.
  5. Shape the dough into two or four small balls. Wrap them in cling wrap and place them in the fridge for an hour to rest.
  6. While the dough is in the fridge, using an electric mixer, whip together all of the ingredients for the filling until it’s smooth. Store in the fridge until it’s ready to use.
  7. After you’ve let the dough rest, flour a surface to begin rolling it out. Using a floured rolling pin, roll your dough into a flat, thin piece.
  8. Using a cookie cutter or a knife, cut the dough into symmetrical rectangular pieces.
  9. Decide which piece will be the top of your pastry and poke a few holes in it using a fork.
  10. Place each bottom layer on a silpator parchment paper and add some filling in the middle of the square, being careful not to over-fill.
  11. Whisk together an egg and 2 Tbsp of water to create an egg wash.
  12. Using a pastry brush, brush the egg wash on the edges of the bottom piece of dough.
  13. Place the top piece of dough over the bottom piece. Gently press the edges of the pastry together using your fingers, then go back around and press the edges using a lightly floured fork.
  14. Once your pastries are all set, place them in the oven and bake at 375 for 22-25 minutes.

 

Red Velvet Poptarts Step-by-Step Instructions

In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs, buttermilk, and red food coloring, until blended. Note: I used red icing gel, which is highly pigmented. If you’re using regular food coloring (which is totally fine) you may need to increase the amount of dye you use.

In a large bowl, sift together the cocoa powder, flour, sugar, and salt until well combined.

Homemade Red Velvet Poptarts

Using a pastry blender push in the chunks of cold butter. If you don’t have a pastry blender, you can use your hands and a fork. Cut in the butter until there are no large pieces and your flour mixture resembles coarse, damp sand.

Homemade Red Velvet Poptarts

Fold in the wet ingredients until everything is well combined.

Shape the dough into two or four small balls. I found it easier to roll out four small ones. Wrap them in cling wrap and place them in the fridge for an hour to rest and firm up. I didn’t have any Saran wrap, so I just used Ziplocks.

While the dough is in the fridge, using an electric mixer, whip together all of the ingredients for the filling until it’s smooth. Store in the fridge until it’s ready to use.

After you’ve let your dough rest, flour a surface to begin rolling it out. You’ll want to get this as thin as possible without risking ripping the dough. The tarts that came out thicker were a little too heavy on the crust.

If at any time your dough gets too sticky, just pop it back in the fridge for a few minutes to firm up. Using a floured rolling pin, roll your dough into a flat, thin piece.

Then cut your rectangles for the tarts.

Ok, truth. This whole process will be a lot easier if you have a square shaped cookie cutter, which I didn’t. I spent some time trying to make perfect shaped rectangles and well, you see what I came up with. Let’s just go with it. Plus, my geometry skills needed a workout anyway.

So I used a pizza cutter and a knife and did an ok job at making rectangles and some squares  that were originally meant to be rectangles. Besides, I think the imperfect shapes makes homemade poptarts way more charming.

Once you’ve cut your rectangles, decide which one will be the top and which one will be the bottom of each pastry. For the top layer, use a fork and poke a few holes through the dough to make a vent.

Place each bottom layer on a silpat or parchment paper and add some filling in the middle of the square. I used anywhere from ½ Tbsp to 1 ¼ Tbsp of filling, depending on the size of my pastries. Be sure to avoid over-filling.

Whisk together an egg and 2 Tbsp of water to create an egg wash. Using a pastry brush, brush the egg wash on the edges of the bottom piece of dough. This will create a sealant for the pastry. See the picture below for proof that I’m a messy baker.

Place the top piece of dough over the bottom piece. (Hint: If you have two uneven sizes, try to put the larger size on top.) Gently press the edges of the pastry together using your fingers, then go back around and press the edges using a lightly floured fork.

Once your pastries are all set, place them in the oven and bake at 375 for 22-25 minutes.

You could and should double the filling mixture to create a frosting on the top of these. It’s delicious.

parmesan-baked edamame

Let’s be honest, I really let my sweet tooth get out of hand this holiday and now I’m trying to dial it back a tad. And since it’s the beginning of the year and I know a lot of people (including myself) are trying to stick to their New Year’s goals of cutting back on the sweets, it didn’t seem right to tempt everyone with a blog post of baked goods covered in frosting or peanut butter. Also, can I even still write about New Years? It’s February.

Baked Parmesan Edamame

For this recipe, I grabbed some inspiration from my friend, who commented on one of my MyFitnessPal statuses about her favorite high-protein, low carb snack. She suggested edamame and I picked some up on my last shopping trip.

If you’ve never had edamame, it’s a soybean that you usually steam in the pod. You can eat it by salting them in the shell and sucking them out of the pod. It’s really good and crunchy and satisfying when you want to reach for a potato chip. It doesn’t have an overwhelming bean or pea flavor either.

I normally eat edamame like the method I described above, but this time I decided to venture out and am I glad I did.

I told my boyfriend that these baked parmesan edamame are like Cheeze-Its, but with protein. They’re certainly as addictive.

These are best eaten warm and on the same day, or else they’ll get soggy. But they’re so good that you won’t have any problems with that. We devoured these.

Preheat oven to 400° F.

Generously coat your edamame beans with the olive oil.

Baked Parmesan Edamame

In a small bowl, mix together the flour, parmesan, salt, and pepper until well combined.

I recommend using a fresh grated parmesan (one you’ll find in the refrigerated aisle), instead of the green tubes of parm you find by the pasta. I used to think I hated parmesan because my only exposure to it was that stuff. It’s packed full of preservatives and tastes incredibly bland. Do yourself a favor and either grate your own or buy it freshly grated. It changes everything.

Baked Parmesan Edamame

Using about a handful at a time, place your oil covered beans into the flour mixture and generously coat them.

Baked Parmesan EdamameBaked Parmesan Edamame

Place your battered beans on a silpat or a parchment-lined cookie sheet.

Baked Parmesan Edamame

Bake at 400° F for 30 minutes. Be sure to turn them half-way through to cook them on both sides.

Baked Parmesan Edamame

I hope you enjoy these as much as I did. I’ve seen variations where people have added wasabi, and I was tempted to add sriracha – so let me know if you do!

parmesan-baked edamame
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Try this high-protein snack.
Author:
Recipe type: Appetizer
Yields: 2 cups
Ingredients
  • 9 oz. (or 2 cups) of shelled edamame, cooked, and thawed, if frozen
  • 2 Tbsp of olive oil
  • ¼ cup of flour
  • ½ cup of grated parmesan
  • 2 tsp of salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 ° F.
  2. In a small bowl, mix together the flour, parmesan, salt, and pepper until well combined.
  3. Generously coat your edamame beans with the olive oil
  4. Using about a handful at a time, place your oil covered beans into the flour mixture and generously coat them.
  5. Place your battered beans on a silpat or a parchment-lined cookie sheet.
  6. Bake at 400° F for 30 minutes, turning halfway through..

 

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Parmesan-Baked-Edamame

the weekender 2/1/2015

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Happy February everyone! And perhaps, most importantly, happy Super Bowl Sunday. I’m not into sports, so I won’t be watching the Bowl, unless you mean the Puppy Bowl, which is my favorite. I’ll probably use this time to go to the places in NYC that are normally too crowded to bother (I’m looking at you Trader Joe’s).

These Anti-Valentine’s Day hearts made me laugh. My favorite is “meh.”

Reasons why you’re late.

This hand-painted apron would make a sweet, personalized gift.

I’m so glad copper is in right now. I can never get enough. How elegant is this DIY copper candle? It looks expensive.

I really need to find a reason to use this whale fabric. Suggestions?

These West Coast embroidery kits are stunning. I wish they had some for the East Coast.

Would you try a breakfast soup?

Also for breakfast, these citrus ricotta crepes are so cheery they’d brighten up any winter morning.